When Should You Schedule Knee Repair Surgery? Skip to content

When Should You Schedule Knee Repair Surgery?

You can schedule MACI knee cartilage repair surgery on your own terms.

MACI patient Courtney shares her reasons for choosing MACI — and the convenience and flexibility in scheduling MACI were central to her decision.

Click here to find a MACI specialist in your area

 

Advanced Technology Means There Is No Rush to Schedule.

When you decide to move forward with surgery, your MACI knee implant will be grown from your own cartilage cells. Until that time, your cells are stored in a cryopreservation tank at Vericel’s facilities for several years. That means you can schedule your procedure when it is best for you — and the procedure can be scheduled well in advance.

 

When should you schedule MACI?

Holidays and School Breaks—You may choose to schedule MACI during holidays and school breaks given built-in time off work and school. Plus, during these times family members are often more available to assist with the healing process immediately after surgery.

Before Year-End Insurance Deadlines—Many patients pursue MACI at the end of the year when their health insurance deductibles are already satisfied to lower out of pocket costs of the procedure. And did you know that 85 percent of MACI procedures received insurance approval on the first try?

Unused Vacation Days—MACI patients often use up extra vacation days, especially ones that won’t rollover to the next year, to complete the procedure.

How Can MACI Knee Repair Cartilage Repair help you? Click here to explore the procedure.

 

Please see below for full indication and ISI. Blog posts are intended to provide educational information. Always talk to your doctor with any questions.

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What steps should you be taking prior to your MACI procedure?

Indication and Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

MACI should not be used if you:

  • are allergic to antibiotics such as gentamicin, or materials that come from cow, pig, or ox;
  • have severe osteoarthritis of the knee, other severe inflammatory conditions, infections or inflammation in the bone joint and other surrounding tissue, or blood clotting conditions;
  • have had knee surgery in the past 6 months, not including surgery for obtaining a cartilage biopsy or a surgical procedure to prepare your knee for a MACI implant;
  • or cannot follow a doctor-prescribed rehabilitation program after your surgery

Consult your doctor if you have cancer in the area of the cartilage biopsy or implant as the safety of MACI is not known in those cases.

Conditions that existed before your surgery, including meniscus tears, joint or ligament instability, or alignment problems should be evaluated and treated before or at the same time as the MACI implant.

MACI is not recommended if you are pregnant.

MACI has not been studied in patients younger than 18 or over 55 years of age.

Common side effects include joint pain, tendonitis, back pain, joint swelling, and joint effusion.

More serious side effects include joint pain, cartilage or meniscus injury, treatment failure, and osteoarthritis.

Please see Full Prescribing Information for more information.

Indication

MACI® is made up of your own (autologous) cells that are expanded and placed onto a film that is implanted into the area of the cartilage damage and absorbed back into your own tissue. MACI is used for the repair of symptomatic cartilage damage of the adult knee.

MACI® (autologous cultured chondrocytes on porcine collagen membrane) is made up of your own (autologous) cells that are expanded and placed onto a film that is implanted into the area of the cartilage damage and absorbed back into your own tissue.

MACI is used for the repair of symptomatic cartilage damage of the adult knee.

The amount of MACI applied depends on the size of the cartilage damage. The MACI film is trimmed by your surgeon to match the size and shape of the damage, to ensure the damaged area is completely covered.

Limitations of Use

It is not known whether MACI is effective in joints other than the knee.

It is not known whether MACI is safe or effective in patients over the age of 55 years.