Take the Knee Pain Quiz Skip to content

Question 1 of 7

How severe is your knee pain?

Pain is a sign that something is wrong and is not to be ignored. Did you know that 77% of knee pain sufferers have forgotten what it is like to be pain-free?2 Any knee pain is something worth having checked out.

In what ways is your knee pain limiting your life? (Mark all that apply)

You’re not alone when it comes to knee pain getting in the way.

Of people with chronic knee pain:

77%
no longer participate in at least one activity they previously enjoyed2

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70%
have missed out on doing things they love2

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55%
say their mobility is worse2

If you selected even one way that knee pain limits your life, be sure to share with your doctor.

How long has your pain been going on?

Sometimes pain can get worse over time, yet 74% of knee pain sufferers keep hoping knee pain will resolve itself.2 Start a conversation with your doctor before your knee pain worsens or you suffer further injury.

Have you been told that your knee pain is due to cartilage damage?

Unlike other tissues in the body, cartilage doesn’t heal on its own and the pain can get worse over time. Only your doctor can determine if your pain is due to cartilage damage.

Do you take medication to help manage your knee pain?

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Nearly 3 out of 4 people say they prefer managing pain with medication over surgery.2 But pain medication may not treat the underlying cause.

What non-surgical treatment(s) have you considered or discussed with your doctor?

What surgical treatment(s) have you considered or discussed with your doctor?

Treatments are available to help provide relief and help restore your active lifestyle. If knee pain from cartilage damage is keeping you from activities you once enjoyed, it may be time to discuss MACI with your doctor.

If you have considered surgery, what has held you back?
(Mark all that apply)

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Did you know that 3 out of 4 of knee pain sufferers simply hope their knee pain will resolve itself?2 In some cases, it won’t, or could cause further damage. That’s why it’s always a good idea to talk to your doctor.

Use the information from this quiz to help find out what steps you can take to get back into action.

Take the results of this quiz with you when you meet with your doctor. This information could be valuable for your doctor to use to assess your knee pain and recommend possible next steps. You can also contact a MACI specialist directly to set up an appointment to learn more about a procedure that uses your own cells.

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If you are sidelined by knee pain, see for yourself why MACI may be the next best step for you.

Learn about MACI

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Courtney, MACI patient

“Not having to think about going up and down stairs and worrying about knee pain, just months after surgery, is really meaningful.”

—Courtney, MACI patient

Individual results may vary

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See Courtney’s and others’ stories about how MACI has helped them get back to their active way of life.

Knee Pain Quiz Results

SHARE these answers with your doctor to help decide your next steps.

Knee cartilage damage does not heal on its own and may require treatment. Talk to your doctor or an orthopedic specialist about how knee cartilage damage is limiting your life.

1
 

How severe is your knee pain?

 

2
 

In what ways is your knee pain limiting your life?

 

3
 

How long has your pain been going on?

 

4
 

Have you been told that your knee pain is due to cartilage damage?

 

5
 

Do you take medication to help manage your knee pain?

 

6
 

What non-surgical treatment(s) have you considered or been told about by your doctor?

 

7
 

What surgical treatment(s) have you considered or been told about by your doctor?

 

 
7
 

What surgical treatment(s) have you considered or been told about by your doctor?

 

 
8
 

If you have considered surgery, what has held you back?

 

 
Indication

MACI® (autologous cultured chondrocytes on porcine collagen membrane) is made up of your own (autologous) cells that are expanded and placed onto a film that is implanted into the area of the cartilage damage and absorbed back into your own tissue.

MACI is used for the repair of symptomatic cartilage damage of the adult knee.

The amount of MACI applied depends on the size of

 

the cartilage damage. The MACI film is trimmed by your surgeon to match the size and shape of the damage, to ensure the damaged area is completely covered.

Limitations of Use

It is not known whether MACI is effective in joints other than the knee.

It is not known whether MACI is safe or effective in patients over the age of 55 years.

 
Important Safety Information

MACI should not be used if you:

  • are allergic to antibiotics such as gentamicin, or materials that come from cow, pig, or ox;
  • have severe osteoarthritis of the knee, other severe inflammatory conditions, infections or inflammation in the bone joint and other surrounding tissue, or blood clotting conditions;
  • have had knee surgery in the past 6 months, not including surgery for obtaining a cartilage biopsy or a surgical procedure to prepare your knee for a MACI implant;
  • or cannot follow a doctor-prescribed rehabilitation program after your surgery

Consult your doctor if you have cancer in the area of the cartilage biopsy or implant as the safety of MACI is not known in those cases.

Conditions that existed before your surgery, including meniscus tears, joint or ligament instability, or alignment problems should be evaluated and treated before or at the same time as the MACI implant.

MACI is not recommended if you are pregnant.

MACI has not been studied in patients younger than 18 or over 55 years of age.

Common side effects include joint pain, tendonitis, back pain, joint swelling, and joint effusion.

More serious side effects include joint pain, cartilage or meniscus injury, treatment failure, and osteoarthritis.

Please see Full Prescribing Information for more information.

MACI® is a registered trademark of Vericel Corporation.
©2022 Vericel Corporation. All rights reserved. PP.US.MAC.1632 v2.0

If you are considering MACI as one of your options, learn more at MACI.com.

 
It's Your move

References: 1. https://www.classicrehabilitation.com/blog/knee-pain-statistics-and-causes/ 2. Data collected from a 2019 Harris Poll survey of 1,002 US adults with knee pain 3 or more days a week that has lasted 2 months or more.

Indication and Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

MACI should not be used if you:

  • are allergic to antibiotics such as gentamicin, or materials that come from cow, pig, or ox;
  • have severe osteoarthritis of the knee, other severe inflammatory conditions, infections or inflammation in the bone joint and other surrounding tissue, or blood clotting conditions;
  • have had knee surgery in the past 6 months, not including surgery for obtaining a cartilage biopsy or a surgical procedure to prepare your knee for a MACI implant;
  • or cannot follow a doctor-prescribed rehabilitation program after your surgery

Consult your doctor if you have cancer in the area of the cartilage biopsy or implant as the safety of MACI is not known in those cases.

Conditions that existed before your surgery, including meniscus tears, joint or ligament instability, or alignment problems should be evaluated and treated before or at the same time as the MACI implant.

MACI is not recommended if you are pregnant.

MACI has not been studied in patients younger than 18 or over 55 years of age.

Common side effects include joint pain, tendonitis, back pain, joint swelling, and joint effusion.

More serious side effects include joint pain, cartilage or meniscus injury, treatment failure, and osteoarthritis.

Please see Full Prescribing Information for more information.

Indication

MACI® is made up of your own (autologous) cells that are expanded and placed onto a film that is implanted into the area of the cartilage damage and absorbed back into your own tissue. MACI is used for the repair of symptomatic cartilage damage of the adult knee.

MACI® (autologous cultured chondrocytes on porcine collagen membrane) is made up of your own (autologous) cells that are expanded and placed onto a film that is implanted into the area of the cartilage damage and absorbed back into your own tissue.

MACI is used for the repair of symptomatic cartilage damage of the adult knee.

The amount of MACI applied depends on the size of the cartilage damage. The MACI film is trimmed by your surgeon to match the size and shape of the damage, to ensure the damaged area is completely covered.

Limitations of Use

It is not known whether MACI is effective in joints other than the knee.

It is not known whether MACI is safe or effective in patients over the age of 55 years.